Imbolc and St Bridgid’s Day

Saint Brigid's cross, made from rushes from Co...

Image via Wikipedia

Today we celebrate these two ancient feast days where we mark the beginning of Spring.  Halfway between the Winter Solstice and Spring Equinox.  It is one of the four cross quarter days the others being Beltane, Lughnasadh and Samhain.

So it’s time to come out of hibernation and start to physically plant our seeds once more.  It’s time to start taking action on those intentions which we set at the New year!  Ask yourself what action can I take today to make my dreams and hopes manifest in my life?

Also today take advantage of St Bridgid’s energy – The Celtic Goddess whom works with the energy of Purification, Healing and Wisdom. 

About St Bridgis’s Day

One folk tradition that continues in both Christian and Pagan homes on St. Brigid’s Day (or Imbolc) is that of the Brigid‘s Bed. The girls and young, unmarried, women of the household or village create a corn dolly to represent Brigid, called the Brideog (“little Brigid” or “young Brigid”), adorning it with ribbons and baubles like shells or stones. They make a bed for the Brideog to lie in. On St. Brigid’s Eve (January 31), the girls and young women gather together in one house to stay up all night with the Brideg, and are later visited by all the young men of the community who must ask permission to enter the home, and then treat them and the corn dolly with respect.

Brigid is said to walk the earth on Imbolc eve. Before going to bed, each member of the household may leave a piece of clothing or strip of cloth outside for Brigid to bless. The head of the household will smother (or “smoor”) the fire and rake the ashes smooth. In the morning, they look for some kind of mark on the ashes, a sign that Brigid has passed that way in the night or morning. The clothes or strips of cloth are brought inside, and believed to now have powers of healing and protection.

On the following day, the girls carry the Brideog through the village or neighborhood, from house to house, where this representation of the Saint/Goddess is welcomed with great honor. Adult women — those who are married or who run a household — stay home to welcome the Brigid procession, perhaps with an offering of coins or a snack. Since Brigid represents the light half of the year, and the power that will bring people from the dark season of winter into spring, her presence is very important at this time of year.

Diamond Light – Ryan

www.sonarexpansionhealing.com

www.oriondiamond.com

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